TNEC’s Principle Investigator David Turcotte contributes beyond worker health and safety

TNEC’s Principle Investigator David Turcotte contributes beyond worker health and safety

The New England Consortium's Principle Investigator, David Turcotte is a well known fixture as a research professor in the Economics Department at UMass Lowell.  He has led and contributed to many projects in Greater Lowell and is best known for his work, Healthy Homes .  UML's Katherine Webster recently interviewed Turcotte about his work on asthma and allergies in the home, reflecting on his nearly two decades research and his continuous drive for improving quality of health in children and seniors. To read the interview in it's entirety, click here.
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New Course at TNEC-Emergence Medical Response: First Aid, CPR, and Stop The Bleed

New Course at TNEC-Emergence Medical Response: First Aid, CPR, and Stop The Bleed

From time to time TNEC will promote a new course on our News and Updates page to inform readers of exciting new happenings at TNEC.  Here is one instance we can do that. Emergency Medical Response: First Aid, CPR, Blood Borne Pathogen and Stop the Bleed Course APRIL 26th  8:00 AM - 4:30PM Delivery at UMass Lowell/TNEC Training Facility Cost $175.00 Click Here to Register What does this course teach? First aid basics; Medical Emergencies; Injury Emergencies; Environmental Emergencies; Preventing illness and injury; Adult CPR and AED use; Opioid-associated life-threatening emergencies; Optional modules in Child CPR AED and Infant CPR;…
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Construction workers say their anxiety and depression has gotten worse amid pandemic: CPWR

Construction workers say their anxiety and depression has gotten worse amid pandemic: CPWR

Safety+Health published a new article citing construction workers are at greater risk for anxiety and depression.  Their symptoms have worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially among women and workers living in poverty, according to a new report from CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training. The Center for Disease and Control and Prevention study concluded that male construction workers have one of the highest suicide rates among all industries and are at four times greater risk than the general public. To read this alarming article in it's entirety, please click on the following link.
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Back to Basics: Cold Stress

Back to Basics: Cold Stress

As winter continues and temperatures are often in a downward trend, it is important to revisit safety measures for personnel.  According to OSHA, winter weather can present hazards.  For example, slippery roads and surfaces, strong winds and environmental cold that can often lead to illnesses, injuries or fatalities.  All of these can happen if employees are exposed to cold stress. To learn more about types of Cold Stress, please click here.  
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Over 100 lawmakers urge OSHA to issue permanent standard on COVID-19 for health care workers

Over 100 lawmakers urge OSHA to issue permanent standard on COVID-19 for health care workers

In a letter dated Jan. 11th addressed to President Joe Biden, lawmakers cite the recent surge in COVID-19 cases including the omicron variant for the need to enhance protections for healthcare workers.  It also states they are exhausted and scared and beyond their breaking points. Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-MI) has joined 114 other members of Congress in calling on OSHA to issue a permanent standard on COVID-19 focused on health care workers. To read the article in its entirety, please click here.
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When politics trump workers’ health, we know who gets burned….

When politics trump workers’ health, we know who gets burned….

In an article from The Hill, Republicans in both chambers of Congress signed on to resolutions to nullify the vaccination-or-test emergency temporary standard (ETS) recently issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).  Republicans are following their long-standing vow of less-government-is good-government law. To read the article in it's entirety, please click here.
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Report: Opioid-related worker deaths skyrocket in Massachusetts

Report: Opioid-related worker deaths skyrocket in Massachusetts

In this week's Safety & Health publication, an article stated the rate of opioid-related overdose deaths among Massachusetts workers in 2016 and 2017 rose 83.7% over the previous five-year period, with construction and agricultural occupations experiencing dramatic jumps. This was cited from a report from the state’s Department of Public Health. In a press release from the Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health, the worker advocacy group calls on policymakers to allocate funds to “workplace prevention and recovery strategies” as well as programs intended to aid workers with opioid misuse disorders.
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NIOSH: Over Half of Workers Do Not Use Hearing Protection

NIOSH: Over Half of Workers Do Not Use Hearing Protection

It's astonishing that nearly half of the workers exposed to occupational noise do not use hearing protection.  This was a result from a recent study from National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).  The study found that agriculture, forestry, fishing, hunting and construction were the top industries not to use hearing protection. To learn more about what the study uncovered, read the article in its entirety.  
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